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Disney Magical World Review

The world where dreams come true lands on the 3DS with enough sparkle and pizzazz to feed all ages with joy. And though it’s a life simulation game by genre, its irresistible charm and humour will keep you playing Disney Magical World for hours on end.

Developed by h.a.n.d and published by Bandai Namco, Mickey and friends welcome players into a magical kingdom full of quests, mischievous ghosts who are more than likely to give Nightmare Before Christmas’ characters a run for their money, and alluring outfits to please every eye. With four main areas to explore through magical portals including the 100 Acre Wood, Cinderella, Alice and Aladdin’s world, there’s plenty of variation when it comes to fetch quests, mini-games and dungeons. But it’s not all enemy tussles and item hunting, you’ll also have real work to do as the owner of a café.

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Time for some carrot cake and honey tea with Rabbit and Piglet at the Cafe!

Rather than owning your own house and paying off pseudo-mortgages Animal Crossing style, Disney Magical World allows players to pocket their earnings from the café’s food produce and purchase new decorations from Chip and Dale’s workshop or themed staff outfits from Daisy’s Boutique. The near two-hour prologue will introduce players to the basics and, while it’s a little cumbersome, children will love getting to grips with gathering materials to make new recipes, as well as the introduction of firm-favourite characters. But while the café is your main source of in-game currency, collecting stickers is just as vital for progression.

Like any other achievement ranking, collecting stickers will unlock new areas within the game’s main hub, Castleton, along with opening up quests, new outfits and decorations. Completing the prologue will award players with 16 stickers, but collecting 77 will conclude the main storyline. These stickers can then be collected throughout the game under seven different sections –  including fishing and farming – which vary in difficulty. Levelling up your café by fulfilling the manager’s requests can also lead to new stickers; unlocking recipes allows players to pick up rarer meals with themes such as Peter Pan, Aladdin, Western, amongst others. Plus, you can even host special-themed parties and invite guests from the Disney universe, taking photos to fill up your album.

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Having a ball with Beauty and the Beast; curtsies at the ready.

While cruising through Disney Magical World’s main hub and quest areas, loading screens can become irksome. Sometimes it can be a mere five seconds, other times you’ll fear the game’s coding has lost its way in the Queen of Hearts’ hedge maze. Also of minor consequence are occasional frame rate drops while running or dashing through Castleton, rather than the top-down view of the quest areas, causing lag or blips during gameplay. Yet it’s mainly the game’s penchant for crash glitches in Alice’s World which delivers an odd, unsettling feeling for players. Whether it’s haunted cruelly by the threats of cutting off one’s head or just bad luck, encountering enemy Boingo’s and warp panels may trigger crashes, forcing players to restart from their last auto-save point.

Generally the game’s best moments lie within the quest areas. Enemies and bosses are varied enough to avoid monotony, while layouts are simple and require classic switches and levers to open up sealed off areas. Drop rates for rare items are primarily based on luck, so players will often have to replay quests to obtain certain materials – no qualms for seasoned dungeon crawlers. The automated aiming system, however, may even have the troublesome Stitch raising an eyebrow. Your wand will target the closest enemy or object in range, which can be perilously awkward when facing bosses with rotating teacups and illuminated lamps, hitting everything but the main target. Here, camera angles also become the enemy with strange zooms that distort your field of vision.

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Dancing with the Stars? Strictly Come Dancing? Er, no.

Without a shadow of a doubt, Disney Magical World’s ballroom dancing sequences might just end your friendship with Cinderella all together. Aside from throwing a curveball into the game, the musical mini-game can have you bibbidi-bobbidi-booing in utter frustration. Touchscreen tapping will rarely follow the rhythm of the beat giving you a string of misses and, coupled with the distracting background on the top screen, players may end up seeing stars rather than dancing with the stars.

Despite the game’s blips and hang-ups, Disney Magical World blossoms with its amusing episodes, excellent outfit and decoration choice, and character interaction. As in the words of Eeyore, it might not be much of a tale, but you do get sort of attached to it.

7.5/10


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Check Out The Halloween Themed Trailer For Project Cars

Slightly Mad Studios together with Bandai Namco has uploaded a brand new trailer for Project Cars. The scary season is now in full swing with Halloween just one week away, so the British-based developer has given fans a sneak peek of nighttime driving. You can check out the trailer above with its high-speed thrills and spooky setting. Project Cars will be available on March 20, 2015 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, and a later but currently unspecified date in 2015 for the Wii U.

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Win Nintendo eShop Credit With Tomodachi Life In The UK

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Nintendo UK will be running a promotion which could earn you £20 worth of eShop credit. To be in for a chance of winning the credit all you will need to do is snap a photo of Tomodachi Life with the hashtag of #MyTomodachiLife on Twitter or Facebook. If you don’t use social media you can also email mytomodachilife@nintendo.co.uk and each week they will select a new theme and weekly winner. Be sure to check out the infographic above if you’re planning to enter.

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Thomas Was Alone Coming To Wii U eShop On November 25th

Curve Studios have announced via Twitter that the 2D puzzle platformer Thomas Was Alone is coming to Wii U and Sony’s PlayStation 4 on November 25th. The game is priced up at $9.99 / £6.99. You can watch a video of the game in action, below.

 

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Here’s A Look At The Nintendo Costume Concept Art For Bayonetta

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Platinum Games has revealed that the idea behind adding iconic Nintendo costumes to Bayonetta arose when Hideki Kamiya asked the talented developers to create a Princess Peach costume. Kamiya was won over by the design so he requested that they create more costumes themed on Nintendo characters. You can see some of the lovely designs, below.

Thanks, Michelle

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Wii U Can Connect To Two GameCube Controller Adapters Simultaneously

A single Wii U console can connect to two Nintendo GameCube controller adapters simultaneously. This feature is supported by Super Smash Bros. for Wii U’s recently-revealed 8-player Smash mode, which lets eight players fight at the same time in local multiplayer matches. The adapter will launch alongside the Wii U version of the fighting title on November 21st. Nintendo is also planning to release a bundle that includes the game, one GameCube controller and an adapter.

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Nintendo Unveils Over 50 Features For Super Smash Bros Wii U (Nintendo Direct Roundup)

Nintendo has unleashed a deluge of information about Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, including an eight-player mode, special offers for fans who get both Wii U and Nintendo 3DS versions and a variety of options and surprises exclusive to the Wii U version. Nintendo revealed these and many more details in a live-streamed video announcement named Super Smash Bros. for Wii U: 50 Must-See Things

Some of the topics covered in the video include:

  • Eight-Player Mode: In a first for the series, a special mode lets eight players fight simultaneously in local multiplayer. This option appears only in the Wii U version, and lets players compete on special, larger stages to accommodate all the characters.
  • amiibo Figures: Once a player touches an amiibo figure to the NFC touchpoint on the Wii U GamePad, the character joins as a “Figure Player”. The amiibo figures can gain levels to become stronger as they gain experience through battling and are fed equipment by the player. Players can also have amiibo fight each other, and amiibo will bring you presents from the battles they fight in.
  • Online Multiplayer: This time it’s possible to team up locally with a friend to compete “With Anyone” online, amongst other options. In the future, players will be able to set up customised Tourneys and there will also be Official Tourneys. Voice Chat with Friends through the GamePad before and after battle, on the Fighter Selection and Results screens.
  • Custom Stage Creation: The touch screen of the Wii U GamePad makes it easier than ever for players to build their own stages and, after a future update, share them with friends and other players around the world.
  • Controls: The Wii U version features more controller options than any other game in the series, such as the Nintendo GameCube Controller through the GameCube Controller Adapter for Wii U, amongst others. In addition, players who own the Nintendo 3DS version of the game can use their Nintendo 3DS or 2DS systems to control the action on the TV screen in Smash Mode on the Wii U version.
  • Importing Fighters: Fans of the Nintendo 3DS version of the game can immediately benefit from the fruits of their smashing labours. Players can import custom Nintendo 3DS fighters (including Mii Fighters) to the Wii U game, along with their customised equipment, costumes and hats.
  • Special Soundtrack Offer: Everyone who registers both the Nintendo 3DS and the Wii U versions of Super Smash Bros. on Club Nintendo during the promotional period will receive a two-disc soundtrack of music from the games.
  • Mewtwo: This veteran fighter will be made available as free downloadable content in Spring 2015 for anyone who registers both the Wii U and Nintendo 3DS versions of the game with Club Nintendo during the promotional period*.
  • Modes: The Wii U version of the game offers many new modes and different ways to play that keep players coming back for more, including:
    • Smash Tour: A fighting party game that looks like a board game. Players use items, spin a wheel and advance around the map. Up to four players can compete at once as they navigate the board and gain fighters and power-ups they can use in a final battle.
    • Special Orders: In Master Orders, the more difficult the order from Master Hand you undertake, the higher your reward – but you only get to try once. In Crazy Orders, you pay to enter and battles get harder the longer you survive. Will you know when to stop and reap your rewards?
    • Special Smash Mode: Players can customise battles and play any way they like.
    • Coin Battles: Players compete to collect coins from other players.
    • Stamina Matches: Players fight until their hit points reach zero.
    • Classic Mode: One or two players fight through a series of battles and advance as long as they survive. Many random events can shake things up, and players can adjust the intensity settings. The more difficult the game, the greater the rewards.
    • All-Star Mode: Unlike in the Nintendo 3DS version, opponents appear in reverse chronological order, and two players can battle through this mode together.
    • Event Mode: One or two players take on set character and theme-based battles. Clearing stages helps players see the way forward.
  • Masterpieces: This menu gives players a peek into the past lives of some of the Super Smash Bros. characters. Players can play cut-down versions of selected characters’ greatest games.
  • Stages: The Wii U game offers more stages, with more variety, than any game in the series. There is now an expanded version of the original Battlefield stage named Big Battlefield. The Great Cave Offensive, based on the underground labyrinth found in Kirby Super Star, challenges players to avoid potentially lethal danger zones – or throw their opponents into them. The Jungle Hijinxs stage, based on Donkey Kong Country Returns, features dual-plane battles with a foreground and background, and blast barrels that shoot players from front to back and vice versa. After launch, a new Miiverse stage will feature players’ posts from Miiverse, where posts will appear in-game to cheer on the fighters.
  • My Music: The game includes hundreds of songs and jingles that players can listen to, as well as settings to customise what music plays during gameplay. Players add songs to their library by collecting CDs that appear while smashing or after completing challenges.
  • Movies: When players clear Classic or All-Star Mode, they’ll be treated to a brief movie featuring whichever fighter they used. Every fighter has a movie, so it’ll be a challenge to view them all. Additionally, HD versions of the new fighter introduction videos are available to watch.
  • Ridley: Fans have been clamouring for Ridley to appear in a Super Smash Bros. game for a while and now they’re getting their wish – but true to form, Ridley appears in an unexpected way. Players will find him in the Metroid series-inspired Pyrosphere stage, but he does more than just hassle players. If one player attacks Ridley enough, Ridley will join that fighter’s side and attack others. Players (including the one on Ridley’s side) can KO Ridley to earn the point for match results. If Ridley consumes the energy to the side of the ledges, he will become Meta Ridley – and all the more vicious!
  • Characters: The Wii U version offers players 40 characters plus Mii Fighters from the start. Each character’s moves match those found in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, so players who hone their skills in the portable game will have an edge over opponents in the console version of the game.

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