Nintendo’s Bill Trinen Cancels His EVO 2015 Appearance

We reported earlier last week that Nintendo of America’s Bill Trinen would be making his way to EVO 2015 to participate in their Super Smash Bros. for Wii U tournament. However, it looks like Trinen’s plans have changed (possibly after reconsidering the pounding Reggie recieved at the Nintendo World Championships 2015). According to his Twitter account, Trinen had a change of plans and had to cancel his trip — likely due to the recent and unexpected death of Nintendo CEO and Worldwide President, Satoru Iwata, as noted in the tweet:

Bill Trinen Stars On This Week’s IGN Nintendo Voice Chat Podcast

Those of you who enjoy listening to IGN’s Nintendo Voice Chat podcast will be pleased to learn that this week it features Bill Trinen as a special guest. In case you don’t know Mr Trinen, he is the Senior Product Marketing Manager of Nintendo of America. This could well be the first time in a long time that the podcast has featured a Nintendo employee. Trinen discusses a number of things including the EVO fighting tournament, which he is entering, and also this week’s San Diego Comic Con. You can listen to the hour-long podcast, right here.

Thanks, Infamous

Nintendo’s Bill Trinen Will Be Participating In Evo 2015 In The Smash Bros Wii U Tournament

It’s true, Nintendo’s very own Bill Trinen will be competing this year at EVO 2015. Trinen tweeted confirmation that he would be participating in the Super Smash Bros Wii U tournament. The EVO 2015 event kicks off on July 17th and ends on July 19th. There’s going to be plenty of games played, and more importantly, plenty of fearsome competitors. It should be a good show this year.

Thanks, Camo

Bill Trinen Messes Up Firing Joke From E3 Announcement On Twitter

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Nintendo just announced their plans for E3, introducing back the Nintendo World Championship in a funny and pleasant video. Part of the video at the end joked that Bill Trinen was fired, but if you saw his Twitter earlier on, it looks like he spoiled that joke. He had tweeted an hour earlier saying: “I guess nothing can last forever.” Shocking Nintendo fans into thinking he’d left, when in reality it was supposed to be part of the joke, which he’d tweeted an hour early after getting confused with timezones! He’d also changed his Twitter bio to “used to work at Nintendo” but since then he’s changed it to “still works at Nintendo.” Poor Bill, Time zones are hard!

Other Nintendo Franchises Could Get The Mario Maker Treatment If It Sells Well

Nintendo of America’s Bill Trinen has hinted that Nintendo could produce Mario Maker style games for their existing franchises providing that the original game is a success when it launches sometime this year. Trinen says that Mr Tezuka is busy on the development side of things but the team at Nintendo are excited to see what the users create once the game is released.

We have nothing to announce on that now. Mr. (Takashi) Tezuka is working hard on Mario Maker and the game is progressing really nicely. I think it’s going to be a lot of fun seeing what people are able to do with the game when it comes out. During E3, we had everyone from moms and kids to longtime Nintendo fans and newer folks who just got into gaming lately just having tons of fun with the way they’re able to create stages. Depending on how people react, we’ll see if the teams take a similar approach with other franchises.

Here’s iJustine Playing Mario Kart 8 With Shigeru Miyamoto And Bill Trinen

Following on from iJustine’s interesting and informative interview with Mr Miyamoto and Bill Trinen, she got to take on the legends herself in a vicious game of Mario Kart 8 for Wii U. The video is lacking some super skills, but it’s great to see Shigeru Miyamoto and Bill Trinen team up to take on iJustine.

Thanks, WhiteEagle

Bill Trinen Talks About The Background Of Nintendo Treehouse

Online gaming publication Siliconera recently had the opportunity to sit down with Bill Trinen, the Director of Product Marketing at Nintendo of America. Bill explained about the origins of Nintendo Treehouse and how it was in the early days compared to now.

“The thing about Treehouse is that it’s actually a huge team [now]. When I joined Nintendo back in ’98, there were two of us. We localized games, captured all the screenshots for promotional materials, wrote all of the manuals, captured all of the footage to help with T.V. ads for media…the list gets longer.”

“From there, the team started to grow, and one of the first things I said was, ‘We really need somebody else to capture the footage [for media], because there’s actual localization work to do, and we can’t do it all,’ so then we added what’s now called our Marketing Support Team.”

“Then there’s my team. I left out of localization several years ago and started up what is essentially the product marketing team. Our role is to educate the NOA internal marketing teams and their agencies on what the products are and how they can identify the key features of a product.”

“We also have our brand management/Pokémon team that handles all of the Pokémon products. They do some things around the Kirby franchise. Today, Treehouse is a very large group. Localization alone is 40 or 50 people. It’s hard to imagine that we started by translating text into .txt files.”

“There have actually been rumors that Mr. Miyamoto is going to retire, you know, so this E3 we were going to spread the rumor that the two of us had bought a place in a Hawaii and that we’re going to retire together. But really, when I first joined Nintendo it was in 1998. I had gone in for an interview on a contract job and didn’t hear back, so, I just sort of assumed I didn’t get the job. Then I heard back from this agency that had hooked me up with the interview and they said, ‘well yeah, they don’t want to hire you for the contract job, they just want to HIRE you!’ So, naturally, I said, hey, sure—I’ll do that!”

“As a part of the testing process for Ocarina of Time, we were doing these nightly telephone conference calls, because we didn’t have video conference technology back then—but we at least had email—so we would do these calls every night and I ended up being the one who was translating them for the testing team in Redmond.”

“I was going about my merry way for a few months when, one day, Jim Merrick comes up to me and says, ‘you’re Bill, right? You speak Japanese, don’t you?’ I was young and naïve, so of course I said, ‘Yeah! Yeah I speak Japanese!’

“Miyamoto was really nervous because he had never spoken in front of an audience that large before—and I was really nervous because I had never met Mr. Miyamoto. I can’t remember it exactly, but there was this little joke at the beginning…anyways, we got on stage, and he gets to his joke, tells it, I translate it, and the whole room just busts up. That’s been our motto ever since—whenever were doing anything, we don’t really care what the audience thinks, the two of us are just going to get up and have fun.”

“Before the trip, I told my wife, ‘I’m going to come back either looking for a new job or I’ll be staying at Nintendo for a very long time.”