Platinum Says It Was Nerve-wracking Working With Shigeru Miyamoto On Star Fox Zero

One of the surprise announcements of E3 this year was the announcement that Star Fox Zero is being developed by none other than Platinum Games. Yusuke Hashimoto, who also directed Bayonetta 2, says development of the game was very fun, especially collaborating again with Nintendo. However, Hashimoto also revealed that it was “nerve-wracking” when Shigeru Miyamoto stepped in to show them a new idea, asked them what they thought, and they had to come up with a decent answer about whether it should be implemented or not.

“The three of us are always working together and it’s very fun,” Hayashi says, “but obviously when Mr. Miyamoto shows you something and is like, what do you think of this, and you have to come up with a good answer, it’s very nerve-wracking.”

“I’m struck by how fast this goes,” says Hashimoto. “The turnaround between the exchange of the two parties is very quick. It’s a kind of development speed I haven’t really seen before.”

Miyamoto Meets Puppet Miyamoto: The Movie

While Nintendo’s Digital Event @ E3 was undeniably shaky, one thing that most viewers could agree on was that the Jim Henson performance was funny, adorable, and flat-out awesome. However, how did this idea come to be? What was Miyamoto’s first reaction when seeing the puppet version of himself? All questions are answered in Nintendo’s YouTube video below which operates as a part-interview, part-tour of Jim Henson Studios.

Miyamoto Explains Why Nintendo Isn’t Jumping On The VR Band Wagon

Both Sony and Microsoft have their Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality solutions for the near-future, but Nintendo thus far is without one. That’s not something that really concerns Shigeru Miyamoto who doesn’t feel like it’s a good fit with Nintendo’s current philosophy. As you already know Miyamoto is more interested in social gaming with family and friends in the same room. However, we did hear earlier that Nintendo is currently experimenting with Virtual Reality as Reggie said “We that do our own internal experiments, but we don’t believe it’s ready for prime time yet.” Here’s what Shigeru Miyamoto had to say about VR.

“The current types of virtual reality aren’t really a good fit for Nintendo’s philosophy of trying to create entertainment that people can play together in the living room,” said Miyamoto. “We’re constantly looking at different technology and experimenting with different elements of it, but we’re not feeling virtual reality is currently in a place where it’s ready to be released – as a product that fits with our philosophy of fitting in the living room.”

“We’re here at E3 this year to really focus on the games that are launching within the next year or so,” he said. “We’re not showing off or showcasing anything that’s further down the road, and that’s why you don’t see us here with any samples of potential virtual reality type experiences.”

Star Fox Wii U Shouldn’t Have Locked Content Behind Amiibo

There’s plenty of people out there that are skeptical of amiibo and think of them as expensive DLC. Kotaku recently had the opportunity to interview Shigeru Miyamoto and one of the questions posed to him was whether Star Fox will have any locked content that only amiibo can unlock. Miyamoto said that so far this isn’t the case, but those with a Star Fox amiibo should get a little something extra.

“In terms of being able to unlock content, I don’t really want to go down that path. For this game, I think of it more as, for people who have the Amiibo, they’re going to get a little something extra and that’s how I’m planning on it with this game. So rather than actual abilities or things like that changing in the game, it would be like getting a different skin for the Arwing or something like that.”

“So, I don’t really want to talk about Nintendo in general today, but in terms of what I’m doing with Star Fox, I’m really not thinking about there being locked content or there being a mode that you won’t be able to play if you don’t have one. Since we already have the existing Smash Bros. Amiibos I basically want to put in something so if you already have those Amiibos, I imagine people will try and tap them on Star Fox anyway, and I want to make sure there is something that gives them a nice charge when they do that.”

Thanks, MasterPikachu6

Miyamoto Has Blamed Wii U Struggles On High Price And Tablets

There’s a number of things that have gone wrong when it comes to Nintendo’s current home console, the Wii U. However, Nintendo’s very own Shigeru Miyamoto has blamed the console’s struggles on its high price point and the high adoption rates of tablets and smartphones. He hopes that the successor to the Wii U, the NX, will be a bigger success and hints that affordability will be king.

“So unfortunately with our latest system, the Wii U, the price point was one that ended up getting a little higher than we wanted. But what we are always striving to do is to find a way to take novel technology that we can take and offer it to people at a price that everybody can afford. And in addition to that, rather than going after the high-end tech spec race and trying to create the most powerful console, really what we want to do is try to find a console that has the best balance of features with the best interface that anyone can use.”

“But really what’s most important to us is, how do we create a system that is both unique and affordable so that everyone can afford it and everyone can enjoy it.”

“So I don’t think it’s just price, because if the system is appealing enough, people will buy it even if the price is a little bit high. I think with Wii U, our challenge was that perhaps people didn’t understand the system. But also I think that we had a system that’s very unique — and, particularly with video game systems, typically it takes the game system a while to boot up. And we thought that with a tablet-type functionality connected to the system, you could have the rapid boot-up of tablet-type functionality, you could have the convenience of having that touch control with you there on the couch while you’re playing on a device that’s connected to the TV, and it would be a very unique system that could introduce some unique styles of play.”

“I think unfortunately what ended up happening was that tablets themselves appeared in the marketplace and evolved very, very rapidly, and unfortunately the Wii system launched at a time where the uniqueness of those features were perhaps not as strong as they were when we had first begun developing them. So what I think is unique about Nintendo is we’re constantly trying to do unique and different things. Sometimes they work, and sometimes they’re not as big of a hit as we would like to hope. After Wii U, we’re hoping that next time it will be a very big hit.”

Thanks, Shuhei Yoshida

 

Star Fox Zero Started Off As A Prototype For The Wii

One of the things that most people picked up on with Star Fox Zero was the textures, notably those on the ground. Well, it turns out that the newest entry in the Star Fox franchise began life as a prototype for the original Wii. They created something that they thought could be a Star Fox title and ran with it. Obviously a lot of things have changed notably the fact that this specific Star Fox is developed by Platinum Games and it’s on Nintendo’s latest home console. Here’s what Shigeru Miyamoto had to say.

 “This Star Fox started out being based on a prototype we created for the Wii,” he tells us. “We took that prototype and thought about what we could do with it. We came back and just said that this should be a Star Fox game.”

Thanks, The Last Word

2001: Sonic Creator Says He Wanted To Make Games That Could Stand Shoulder To Shoulder With Nintendo

An interview has been published online from way back in 2001 between Sonic creator Yuji Naka and legendary Nintendo developer Shigeru Miyamoto. In the interview Sega developer Yuji Naka states that his intentions weren’t to beat Nintendo, but to make games that could stand shoulder to shoulder with theirs. The interview was conducted by Japanese gaming publication Famitsu right before the Japanese release of Sonic Advance back in December 2001.

Naka: Since the beginning, Sega has been saying “we need to beat Nintendo!” But my intention wasn’t really to “beat” Nintendo, but to make games that could stand shoulder to shoulder with theirs. If you try to make the exact same thing you’ll never win; you’ve got pursue a different path. That was our thinking when we made Sonic… but of course, when Miyamoto showed me new games like Mario 64, I realized we were lagging behind again! Just when I thought we were on par, he goes and puts out an amazing game like that.

Miyamoto: Well, whether you’re leading or trying to play catch up, I think that’s ultimately something that the players decide. We’re not exactly sitting cross-legged in some zen pose either; we’re diligently trying to stay ahead! (laughs) You overtook us in a big way in America, after all.

Naka: But Mario has sold 100 million copies. We can’t compete with that!

Miyamoto: Our thinking about that is the same as Namco’s. In their development process, they always spend a lot of time in the final tune-up phase. They’re very smart about programming there. So, in our own way, we too take a lot of time with game balancing: it’s like, “ok everyone, time for the tune-up!” That thinking derives from a saying we have at Nintendo: “it takes 5 years to build your brand, but only 2 to ruin it.”

Naka: I would love to work with Miyamoto on a game, at least once. I’m really interested in the details of your development process.

Naka: I’d like to see Sonic in a Smash Bros. game someday. (laughs) Actually, I talked about it at Space World with the director of the last Smash Bros. He said “I wish you’d have said something sooner!” (laughs)

Miyamoto: Well, if Sega is ok with it, we can add him anytime. I like that idea! (laughs)