Smosh Games Race Shigeru Miyamoto In Mario Kart 8

Those lucky folk over at YouTube channel Smosh Games got the chance to race against the revered Shigeru Miyamoto and Bill Trinen in a multiplayer game of the wonderful Mario Kart 8. You can watch all the crazy shenanigans in the video embedded above. I wonder who Mr Miyamoto and Bill Trinen will visit next?

Thanks, KingBooDude and Retrogaminglord

Shigeru Miyamoto Does Yes/No-Style Questionnaire With Nintendo Dream

Respected video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto has taken part in a series of yes/no-style questionnaires with Japanese publication Nintendo Dream. The publication compares how Miyamoto responded in previous interviews where he was asked the very same questions. Here’s how his answers stack up.

Q: Are you having fun at work?
Now: Yes
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I often dream of work
Now: No
9/06: No
1/99: No

Q: I consider myself of good fortune
Now: Big Yes (Waving the answer-plate)
9/06: Big Yes
1/99: Yes

Q: I want to make games until I die
Now: (after thinking about it) No –> Maybe
9/06: Yes
1/99: Yes

Q: If I were reborn I would work for Nintendo again
Now: Yes (“This answer is kind of suspicious” (laughs))
9/06: Maybe
2/98: Maybe

Q: I want to be president of Nintendo once
Now: No
9/06: No
1/99: No

Q: I don’t fully understand what young people are talking about
Now: Yes (“I’m actually trying to stay in the loop but…” (laughs))
9/06: Maybe
1/99: No

Q: I’m a morning-person
Now: No
9/06: No
2/98: No

Q: I’m a good husband
Now: (thinking about it) No (“If I say No, the reality might actually become a Yes”)
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I’m a good parent
Now: (“This one is the same I guess”) No
9/06: Yes
2/98: Maybe

Q: I’m being loved by my subordinates
Now: (“This one as well” (laughs)) No
9/06: No
2/98: Maybe

Q: I’m glad I was born Japanese
Now: Yes
9/06: Maybe
2/98: No

Q: I want to live until I’m 100 years old
Now: No (“I don’t think I’m going to die, so I’m contradicting myself” (laughs))
9/06: Yes
2/98: Yes

Q: I don’t like planes
Now: Yes (“When travelling inside Japan I will always take the Shinkansen bullet-train”)
9/06: Yes
2/98: Yes

Q: I want to fall in love again
Now: Yes (“This will always be a Yes”)
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I want to make a movie
Now: No
9/06: No
12/97: No

Thanks, MasterPikachu6

Nintendo President Agrees There Are Too Many Cut-Scenes In Video Games Nowadays

Most of the video games we play these days are littered with lengthy cut scenes as a way to progress with the story. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata says that there are simply too many in video games nowadays and that Shigeru Miyamoto would agree with him on this statement. Iwata said that Miyamoto is one of the few developers that isn’t reliant on producing cut-scenes and he wonders what could have been done instead with the time, money and resources.

Iwata: So [modern games] are backed by this huge amount of effort and technology, but it feels like very few people remember them [story moments] or players skip over things within the game.

Kawakami: It certainly feels like there’s too many cut-scenes these days.

Iwata: Of course, you can use them effectively; I’m not trying to dismiss them completely, but I can’t help but wonder what could have been instead done with the energy [time, money, resources] that went into them. Miyamoto has never used many cut-scenes, in his games, but recently I think he has begun to think the same way, too.

Iwata Admits That Miyamoto Used To Be His Rival

In a strange turn of events Nintendo president Satoru Iwata has conceded that legendary video game developer Shigeru Miyamoto was once his rival. Iwata says that Miyamoto possessed a methodology that he doesn’t have and Iwata felt that it was a waste that he never had it. Here’s the interview that was part of a longer one with Japanese publication, 4Gamer.

Iwata: So, I have this strange sense of duty regarding the codifying of the ‘Miyamoto Methodology’, because I feel like it would be useful to the game industry if you could put it into words. I started up a project similar to ‘Iwata Asks’ for that purpose. And, of course, wanted to see it put into words so I could understand it too, because back when I was just starting out, I sort of arbitrarily decided that Miyamoto was my rival, though that’s embarrassing to admit now.

Kawakami: Your rival? Mr. Miyamoto?

Iwata: Yes. Would you believe that for a long time I’d just decided within myself, completely arbitrarily and not at all reciprocated, that he was my rival and I wanted to do something to just give him hell.

Kawakami: Well fair enough, but in the end did you ever manage to give him hell?

Iwata: Umm, well, maybe a little (wry laugh)

All: (Laughs)

Iwata: Miyamoto is, as you’d expect, an amazing person and without a doubt posseses a methodology that I don’t have. And I always felt it was a waste that it wasn’t verbalized.

Kawakami: It caused a buzz online, but Mr. Miyamoto’s definition of a good idea* is quite remarkable.

*”A good idea is something that does not solve just one single problem, but rather can solve multiple problems at once.”

Iwata: Yes, that one’s great. I thought ‘Yes, that’s a great quote! It’ll be popular with people’, so I went and spread it around as much as I could and it’s become quite well known (laughs).

Kawakami: Yes, it has. It’s like, to put it another way, realizing that killing two birds with one stone was about ideas too! (laughs)

Iwata: Yes. It’s the perspective that solving multiple problems with one solution is what an idea is.

Kawakami: But when people say ‘I got it!’ or ‘That’s it!’, it’s usually like that. So, I think from a cognitive point of view, it’s the correct definition.

Iwata: It’s probably the same as the ‘A-ha!’ moment that they talk about in neuroscience. Things that, at first glance, didn’t appear connected actually are and you can say ‘if I just do this to this thing and that thing, I can solve all these problems in one go and everything will work beautifully.’ That’s the ‘I got it!’ moment.

Kawakami: Yes.

Iwata: Miyamoto also says that when a problem just can’t be solved no matter what, someone is lying.

4Gamer: Lying?

Iwata: Yes. He doesn’t mean lying in a bad way, but that the person’s thought-process is mistaken, or they’re looking at the problem the wrong way.
Miyamoto is like, how do I put this, he’s a genius at creating perception changes. Explaining the value of changing one’s perception in an easily understood manner makes people happy, so it’s a very interesting skill (laughs).

Here’s iJustine Playing Mario Kart 8 With Shigeru Miyamoto And Bill Trinen

Following on from iJustine’s interesting and informative interview with Mr Miyamoto and Bill Trinen, she got to take on the legends herself in a vicious game of Mario Kart 8 for Wii U. The video is lacking some super skills, but it’s great to see Shigeru Miyamoto and Bill Trinen team up to take on iJustine.

Thanks, WhiteEagle

Miyamoto Speaks About That Mario Movie Leak

Remember when Sony Pictures was hacked and details emerged that they were planning a Mario movie? Well Shigeru Miyamoto has played down those rumours by stating that he regularly gets pitches about a Super Mario Bros movie from numerous companies and it’s nothing unusual. He also said that he doesn’t have a “vision that the next iteration of “Mario” is going to be in film.”

I heard something about that this morning. What’s interesting is that over the past 20 years, people come to us on a fairly regular basis about creating “Mario” movies. There are times that those ideas end right when they bring them to us, and other times we’ll listen to presentations. It’s not very unusual, and it’s something we’ve been doing for a very long time. I don’t particularly have a vision that the next iteration of “Mario” is going to be in film.

Miyamoto Says Star Fox Wii U Will Be ‘Very Fun And Unique’

We haven’t seen anything of Star Fox Wii U other than a single screen of the game in action, so hopefully more will be revealed during a Nintendo Direct. That hasn’t stopped Mr Miyamoto from talking about his pet project, which he has describes as very fun and unique. We already know that there’s going to be heavy GamePad integration which will no doubt please Wii U fans.

I like to create gameplay mechanics more than I do stories. The story might not be too different from past “Star Fox” games, but the gameplay mechanics are going to feel very different because of the two-screen system of the Wii U with the GamePad and TV screen. It’ll make for a very fun and unique way to play.