Super Stable 3D Was Added To The New Nintendo 3DS At The Very Last Minute Thanks To Miyamoto

It seems as though we’ve got Shigeru Miyamoto to thank for the inclusion of Super Stable 3D on the New Nintendo 3DS as the device nearly went into production without it. The news was revealed by Nintendo president Satoru Iwata who said that once again it was Mr Miyamoto who wanted to change the device at the last-minute having seen Super Stable 3D a week before the machine was due to be manufactured. Here’s what he had to say.

“I think you’re probably familiar with the tales of how, in the late stages of development, Mr. Miyamoto always upends the tea table,” said Iwata. “So a similar thing happened this time. The hardware developers had designed a piece of hardware that they felt was at the final stage of prototyping, and they were bringing it to us for approval to begin moving forward with plans for manufacturing. But Mr. Miyamoto had seen that super-stable 3D just one week before, and he asked “Why aren’t we putting that in this system? If we don’t put this in it, there’s no point in making the system.”

Iwata says he was personally asked many times by his internal engineers, “Are we really going to do this?”

“But Nintendo is a company of Kyoto craftsman, and what we don’t want to do, is if we know we can make something better, we don’t want to leave that behind,” he explains. “So we were able to bring the super-stable 3D to reality by looking technically at what we can do to solve those challenges and finding those steps along the way to make it happen. This is where my background in technology is quite helpful, because it means that the engineers can’t trick me.”

Here’s Seven Interesting Insights From Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto

Respected news publication Time has managed to scoop an interview with the revered Shigeru Miyamoto. In the insightful interview Miyamoto discusses everything from his favourite video game platforms to work on to how he personally believes that novels may be more creatively powerful than video games. You can read his full responses, right here.

  • Mario almost superseded the quirky squid-like characters in Nintendo’s upcoming Wii U paint-gun game Splatoon
  • He doesn’t make games with a particular age group in mind
  • He tries not to let his reputation intimidate his design teams
  • He thinks novels may be more creatively powerful than video games
  • He views profit-obsession as a creative roadblock
  • He feels strongly about staying in the hardware side of the business
  • And his favorite Nintendo platform to date is… Wii/DS

Thanks, David S

Nintendo President Says Miyamoto’s Priority Is Currently Wii U Games And Not Mobile

With Nintendo teaming up with DeNA for mobile based titles everyone is now wondering if Shigeru Miyamoto will work his magic on smartphone and tablet titles. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata wouldn’t really divulge much, but simply said that Miyamoto’s main role and priority is on the development of Wii U titles that will be released this year.

Will Nintendo or DeNA be developing these games? And is Mr. Miyamoto [creator of Mario, Donkey Kong, Zelda and other iconic Nintendo franchises] working on anything smart device-related?

Development of smart device games will be mainly done by Nintendo, but it is significant that we are forming a joint development structure with DeNA. Nintendo, through experience in the dedicated game system business, is good at making traditional game products. But for smart devices, in addition to the “product” aspect of a game, the aspect of an ever-evolving “service” is very important—a service that encourages consumers to play every day even for a short time. DeNA has extensive know-how in developing the “service” side of things, and will be primarily responsible for the service-oriented operations. We will be able to greatly leverage strengths of each party.

As for any involvement of Mr. Miyamoto, we will discuss it when possible, but for now, understand that his priority is on the development of Wii U titles that will be launched this year.

Smosh Games Race Shigeru Miyamoto In Mario Kart 8

Those lucky folk over at YouTube channel Smosh Games got the chance to race against the revered Shigeru Miyamoto and Bill Trinen in a multiplayer game of the wonderful Mario Kart 8. You can watch all the crazy shenanigans in the video embedded above. I wonder who Mr Miyamoto and Bill Trinen will visit next?

Thanks, KingBooDude and Retrogaminglord

Shigeru Miyamoto Does Yes/No-Style Questionnaire With Nintendo Dream

Respected video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto has taken part in a series of yes/no-style questionnaires with Japanese publication Nintendo Dream. The publication compares how Miyamoto responded in previous interviews where he was asked the very same questions. Here’s how his answers stack up.

Q: Are you having fun at work?
Now: Yes
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I often dream of work
Now: No
9/06: No
1/99: No

Q: I consider myself of good fortune
Now: Big Yes (Waving the answer-plate)
9/06: Big Yes
1/99: Yes

Q: I want to make games until I die
Now: (after thinking about it) No –> Maybe
9/06: Yes
1/99: Yes

Q: If I were reborn I would work for Nintendo again
Now: Yes (“This answer is kind of suspicious” (laughs))
9/06: Maybe
2/98: Maybe

Q: I want to be president of Nintendo once
Now: No
9/06: No
1/99: No

Q: I don’t fully understand what young people are talking about
Now: Yes (“I’m actually trying to stay in the loop but…” (laughs))
9/06: Maybe
1/99: No

Q: I’m a morning-person
Now: No
9/06: No
2/98: No

Q: I’m a good husband
Now: (thinking about it) No (“If I say No, the reality might actually become a Yes”)
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I’m a good parent
Now: (“This one is the same I guess”) No
9/06: Yes
2/98: Maybe

Q: I’m being loved by my subordinates
Now: (“This one as well” (laughs)) No
9/06: No
2/98: Maybe

Q: I’m glad I was born Japanese
Now: Yes
9/06: Maybe
2/98: No

Q: I want to live until I’m 100 years old
Now: No (“I don’t think I’m going to die, so I’m contradicting myself” (laughs))
9/06: Yes
2/98: Yes

Q: I don’t like planes
Now: Yes (“When travelling inside Japan I will always take the Shinkansen bullet-train”)
9/06: Yes
2/98: Yes

Q: I want to fall in love again
Now: Yes (“This will always be a Yes”)
9/06: Yes
12/97: Yes

Q: I want to make a movie
Now: No
9/06: No
12/97: No

Thanks, MasterPikachu6

Nintendo President Agrees There Are Too Many Cut-Scenes In Video Games Nowadays

Most of the video games we play these days are littered with lengthy cut scenes as a way to progress with the story. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata says that there are simply too many in video games nowadays and that Shigeru Miyamoto would agree with him on this statement. Iwata said that Miyamoto is one of the few developers that isn’t reliant on producing cut-scenes and he wonders what could have been done instead with the time, money and resources.

Iwata: So [modern games] are backed by this huge amount of effort and technology, but it feels like very few people remember them [story moments] or players skip over things within the game.

Kawakami: It certainly feels like there’s too many cut-scenes these days.

Iwata: Of course, you can use them effectively; I’m not trying to dismiss them completely, but I can’t help but wonder what could have been instead done with the energy [time, money, resources] that went into them. Miyamoto has never used many cut-scenes, in his games, but recently I think he has begun to think the same way, too.

Iwata Admits That Miyamoto Used To Be His Rival

In a strange turn of events Nintendo president Satoru Iwata has conceded that legendary video game developer Shigeru Miyamoto was once his rival. Iwata says that Miyamoto possessed a methodology that he doesn’t have and Iwata felt that it was a waste that he never had it. Here’s the interview that was part of a longer one with Japanese publication, 4Gamer.

Iwata: So, I have this strange sense of duty regarding the codifying of the ‘Miyamoto Methodology’, because I feel like it would be useful to the game industry if you could put it into words. I started up a project similar to ‘Iwata Asks’ for that purpose. And, of course, wanted to see it put into words so I could understand it too, because back when I was just starting out, I sort of arbitrarily decided that Miyamoto was my rival, though that’s embarrassing to admit now.

Kawakami: Your rival? Mr. Miyamoto?

Iwata: Yes. Would you believe that for a long time I’d just decided within myself, completely arbitrarily and not at all reciprocated, that he was my rival and I wanted to do something to just give him hell.

Kawakami: Well fair enough, but in the end did you ever manage to give him hell?

Iwata: Umm, well, maybe a little (wry laugh)

All: (Laughs)

Iwata: Miyamoto is, as you’d expect, an amazing person and without a doubt posseses a methodology that I don’t have. And I always felt it was a waste that it wasn’t verbalized.

Kawakami: It caused a buzz online, but Mr. Miyamoto’s definition of a good idea* is quite remarkable.

*”A good idea is something that does not solve just one single problem, but rather can solve multiple problems at once.”

Iwata: Yes, that one’s great. I thought ‘Yes, that’s a great quote! It’ll be popular with people’, so I went and spread it around as much as I could and it’s become quite well known (laughs).

Kawakami: Yes, it has. It’s like, to put it another way, realizing that killing two birds with one stone was about ideas too! (laughs)

Iwata: Yes. It’s the perspective that solving multiple problems with one solution is what an idea is.

Kawakami: But when people say ‘I got it!’ or ‘That’s it!’, it’s usually like that. So, I think from a cognitive point of view, it’s the correct definition.

Iwata: It’s probably the same as the ‘A-ha!’ moment that they talk about in neuroscience. Things that, at first glance, didn’t appear connected actually are and you can say ‘if I just do this to this thing and that thing, I can solve all these problems in one go and everything will work beautifully.’ That’s the ‘I got it!’ moment.

Kawakami: Yes.

Iwata: Miyamoto also says that when a problem just can’t be solved no matter what, someone is lying.

4Gamer: Lying?

Iwata: Yes. He doesn’t mean lying in a bad way, but that the person’s thought-process is mistaken, or they’re looking at the problem the wrong way.
Miyamoto is like, how do I put this, he’s a genius at creating perception changes. Explaining the value of changing one’s perception in an easily understood manner makes people happy, so it’s a very interesting skill (laughs).