Tag Archives: new york times

New York Times Issues 25-Year-Old Correction Regarding Mario’s Day Job

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The New York Times originally posted an article in 1988 which stated that Mario and Luigi were actually janitors, rather than plumbers. Clearly this information was incorrect, but it wasn’t acknowledged until now. However, when The New York Times wrote its obituary on former Nintendo president Hiroshi Yamauchi it included a snippet from the 1988 article which was factually incorrect. On Friday, the New York Times issued the correction as part of its tribute to Yamauchi. Here’s the original snippet.

Many Nintendo best sellers, like ”Super Mario Bros. 2,” are based on wildly preposterous premises, this particular one being two mustachioed Italian janitors who endure various trials, such as dodging hammer-swinging turtles and lava balls and man-eating plants, in order to save a Mushroom Princess. No matter. Kids can’t get enough of the games.

Thanks, Simply G

Founder Of Atari Says He’s Baffled By Wii U, And Doesn’t Think It Will Be A Success

Nolan K. Bushnell, the founder of Atari and the godfather of the games business has told The New York Times that he’s actually baffled by Wii U. Bushnell went on to say that he doubts Nintendo will ever be a major import ever again, and that it feels like the end of an era for the company.

“I actually am baffled by it. I don’t think it’s going to be a big success.”

“These things will continue to sputter along, but I really don’t think they’ll be of major import ever again. It feels like the end of an era to me.”

Nintendo Wii: Swinging Wii Remote Lazily Could Damage Arm

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An article recently posted in the New York Times suggest that Wii owners could be damaging themselves by lazily swinging the remote, rather than doing complete full gestures.

The problem can apparently occur when the player discovers that there’s no need to fully swing your arm in games such as Wii Sports and instead use a simply quick flick of the wrist, causing what’s commonly known as ‘tennis elbow’.

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