Tag Archives: opinion

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GameSpot Says ‘None Of The Inherent Appeal Of Zelda Is Present In Hyrule Warriors’

US gaming publication GameSpot recently went hands on with the upcoming Hyrule Warriors for Wii U. However, according to writer Tom Mc Shea, the fusion between Dynasty Warriors and The Legend of Zelda doesn’t quite comes together. Mc Shea concludes by saying that those who are eager for a new Zelda and think Hyrule Warriors will fill that role will ultimately come away disappointed.

“As someone who adores The Legend of Zelda, there just isn’t much here for me to latch on to. Yes, I’m as weak as anyone to the aesthetic charms of the franchise, but that’s the only part of Zelda that has made the transition. The rest is pure Dynasty Warriors. I thought the game was fun enough, and was impressed by how I could kill so many enemies with so little effort. But I need more than window dressing to make me care about a game. For those who are in my position, eager for a new Zelda and hopeful Hyrule Warriors will fill that role, keep your expectations very low. None of the inherent appeal of Zelda is present here, so you need to care an awful lot about the characters and music to remain interested. If you already enjoy the Warriors series, Hyrule Warriors won’t spoil what draws you to it. At least from what I’ve seen, It sadly doesn’t reach an interesting balance that could have expanded the audience to include those who love The Legend of Zelda, too.”

 

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VGS Says Sonic Boom Is The Worst Sonic Game They’ve Ever Played

Online gaming publication VGS tried out Sonic Boom at this year’s E3 event and didn’t entirely come away enamoured. In fact, the writer claims that Sonic Boom is the worse Sonic game that he has ever played and he has played Sonic 06 and Shadow the Hedgehog. One of the writers biggest gripes with Sonic Boom is the game’s pacing which he claims is slow. Like, Werehog stages slow. You can read his opinions about the latest Sonic title for Wii U and 3DS, below.

“Let me be clear by saying that I’ve played nearly every single Sonic game. Yes, even the bad ones. As a Sonic fan from the early 90’s it’s hard to pass up any of his games. And even though people claim his 3D adventures sucked I actually enjoyed many of them especially SA, SA2, and Generations. Up until now though it’s been well known that Sonic 06 and Shadow the Hedgehog are the worst things to ever happen to the Sonic universe (Spinball for me). Well, after my time spent with the Sonic Boom E3 demo, I walked away frightened and shaken feeling that this could very well be the worst Sonic game made to date.”

“My E3 demo allowed me to explore a few of the game’s different themed levels. There was platforming, running, and a boss battle—each showing the unique aspects of Sonic Boom. The first platforming stage paired me up with Knuckles and it was sort of a brawler type stage. Straight from the get-go I felt something was incredibly off. The timing and precision when attacking enemies felt very clunky and some of my attacks barely registered. This also applied to many of the segments that involved jumping. Then came the lasso. Oh, god. Every time your character needs to pull something they would use this energy lasso, which in concept sounds interesting but ends up feeling dull in practice. It’s basically a web shot mechanic we see in Spiderman games except it’s highly broken and requires a lot of effort to get something simple accomplished. For example, when trying to move the box I had trouble trying to get the lasso to register properly and even when it did it required me to keep pressing down on the A button and move in a certain direction. The one before me (who was playing Sonic Boom at the Nintendo booth) gave up entirely because the lasso didn’t work half the time. I only did it because I wanted to see what was at the end of the demo. Turns out it was a mini-boss which can only be defeated using the lasso by throwing enemies at it. The only problem with was the throwing distance felt off. At times the enemies I threw landed close to where they were supposed to causing more frustration.”

“This leads to my next biggest problem with my Sonic Boom impression, the pacing. This game is slow. Like, Werehog stages slow, maybe even slower considering the lasso takes forever to get something done. I understand that this is an adventure take on the Sonic universe and I honestly don’t mind that at all. But between the long fights, and moving objects around, it just felt kinda boring. There were diversions that broke up the action. For instance I used the Wii U’s gamepad screen to scan the level for items and then dig them out using Knuckles.”

“Sonic Boom needs a lot of work. When I completed my demo I asked one of the reps at BigRedDot if these levels were final and to my horror he acknowledged it with a firm yes. I’m worried what will become of Sonic Boom and if it does turn out to be the next Sonic 06, then that’s a shame because there were some elements I enjoyed. I liked how the characters finally have personality, I enjoyed swapping characters on the fly, and the adventure elements really brought back the Sonic Adventure feel (which is something I haven’t felt in a long time). I want Sonic Boom to succeed but judging by my E3 impressions I fear it will be destined to fail.”

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Family Games Publisher Little Orbit Says We Shouldn’t Underestimate Wii U

Matt Scott, founder and CEO of family games publisher Little Orbit, still thinks there’s hope for Nintendo to boost Wii U sales figures. Scott believes part of Nintendo’s problem has been poor marketing around the console, but this can be rectified. He went onto say that he believes Nintendo needs to be more open with consumers and developers.

“The Wii U is an interesting platform: I think it’s challenged, no question,” Scott said. “Every publisher is caught between the audience that’s out there, and the content they want to put out there. You’re always looking for where the audience is playing games.”

“One of the challenges with Wii U started at the very beginning with Nintendo because they couldn’t target a demographic,” he explained. “They had a zombie game and this and that at launch, and with the Wii it was clearly family-oriented off-demographic. They had content that said, this is what the Wii’s all about.”

“With the Wii U, it had two major problems,” he added. “One is that they didn’t lock the demographic down, they had just a bunch of everything. And two, I believe that they mismarketed it. By calling it the Wii U, everybody thought it was an accessory for the Wii, they thought it was a tablet for the Wii.”

“Why not call it the Wii 2? I just think there was consumer confusion and it’s hard to un-ring that bell now since they’ve been out for almost two years.”

“I think it’s got a unique play pattern with the tablet,” Scott said. “I think kids and adults like the feel of the tablet and that play pattern. There are some really exciting asymmetrical things you can do where you’ve got one guy controlling the field and a bunch of people playing next to him with Wii Remotes, and it’s compelling. It’s different.”

“I think the Wii U should have been the Wii 2,” he reiterated. “I think the consumers that see that, that adopted it — that’s who we’re making games for.”

“Never underestimate Nintendo, right?” he said. “We’ve learned that over and over. Everybody saw GameCube and went oh, this isn’t working, and then it blew us all away. I tend to take a fairly straight view of Nintendo, I think they have a methodology to the ideas they are implementing. I don’t think they are implementing them fast enough, but there are some compelling play patterns between digital products and interaction.”

“Just communicate what you want to do,” he added. “They make great first-party games and design experiences that we all love and that are fun to play, so just tell us what you’re going to do and I think that’s the core problem.”

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TIME Doesn’t Think Nintendo Can Save The Wii U

Influential publication TIME doesn’t think that there’s a possibility that Nintendo can save its struggling Wii U console.  The piece was written after Nintendo announced today that overall net sales fell from last year’s 635.4 billion yen (£3.6bn) to this year’s 571.7 billion yen (£3.3bn). The company posted a 23.2B yen lossHere’s what the publication has to say.

“Nintendo’s Wii U, in contrast, lacks compelling specs, a sweetheart price or a historical PlayStation 2-equivalent to build on. It’s in the same ballpark as the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, oomph-wise, but that’s not what gamers who’ve lived with Sony and Microsoft’s systems for the past six or seven years were looking for in November 2012, nor what seems to be moving them now. The Wii U’s price hasn’t helped matters: $350 at launch, for the only version you’d care to own, the sticker probably forced up by Nintendo’s pricey pseudo-tablet pack-in. The message Nintendo seemed to be sending was this: spend more than you would for an Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3—each of those systems sporting massive libraries flush with acclaimed titles—on a backwards-looking system without a game-changing system-seller. The Wii U has yet to find its Super Mario 64 or Wii Sports.”

“Nintendo’s problem is that it’s in that deadliest of platform catch-22s, where you need a slew of standout, signature games to make your case, leveraged by third-party support for all of the triple-A multi-platform titles. The company has too few of the former and a shrinking dearth of the latter at this point. Third parties have either abandoned the system or failed to sign up for duty in the first place, their worries doubtless confirmed for the second cycle running with these latest fiscal results.”

“And that’s why people aren’t buying the Wii U. Enthusiasts view it as anemic, casual gamers see it as overpriced and there simply aren’t enough diehards loyal to the beloved Nintendo brand to make up those deficiencies. The proof is in those figures.”

Thanks, Simply G

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Eurogamer Says ‘Savour The Wii U And Vita – They’re Our New Dreamcasts’

Respected online gaming publication Eurogamer has written an article declaring that the Wii U and the PlayStation Vita are our new Dreamcasts. However, the publication says this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as despite neither achieving commercial success, they both have a good back catalogue of games.

“Commercial success may evade them, but these ailing consoles are future classics.”

“It’s one of the odd phenomena seemingly exclusive to video game fandom that some people really do care. Sales figures are used as self-validation for those that have picked the most popular side, and there’s no shortage of morbid mobs prematurely ringing the death knell for struggling hardware. The strangely partisan behaviour of players who pledge blind allegiance to corporations is a matter for another day, though – what’s important is to forget about all that, and embrace some of those commercial failures while they’re still around for us to celebrate them.”

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Nintendo DSi Ware Developer Defends Wii U

Hugo Smits, a game developer from Goodbyegalaxygames, has written a blog post titled “Shut up! Nothing is wrong with Nintendo Wii U!” which attempts to defend the Wii U. Smits says the real problem with Nintendo is communication with consumers and developers coupled with Nintendo’s own services. Smits doesn’t think the Wii U is a bad console, but thinks it was just marketed poorly. He goes on to say that the same thing happened with Nintendo 3DS as consumers thought it was just a revised Nintendo DS after all the iterations of the Nintendo DS systems. You can read his post, here.

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Eurogamer Says Iwata Isn’t Nintendo’s Problem. It’s Miyamoto

Online gaming publication Eurogamer has written an in-depth article looking at who to blame for Nintendo’s current predicament. The publication has decided to point the finger at legendary game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, saying that he’s partly to blame for Nintendo’s current woes. You can read the whole thing, here.

“It seems unlikely that Miyamoto himself isn’t aware of this situation. His own record as an innovator suggests otherwise. Perhaps, in greenlighting so many sequels, offshoots and retrospective curios, he is just trying to keep fans tickled and sales ticking over until Nintendo’s next magic bullet is in the chamber. It’s said that he is working on a new franchise for Wii U, as is the Tokyo A-team – perhaps one and the same project. News of what they are up to cannot come soon enough, and I hope it proves me wrong.”

“But even if it does – even if, within Nintendo’s walls, Miyamoto is fighting the company’s more conservative instincts rather than preserving them – perhaps it is time to consider whether his richly deserved legend hasn’t become a gilded millstone for the game creators working under him. He’s a star that cannot be outshone, and his original creations have become needs to be serviced by those who follow him, rather than inspirations for them to find their own voices. I wouldn’t be all that surprised if the great man agreed with me, but it never seemed to him to be the right moment; his successors never seemed to be ready. Perhaps they won’t be until he steps aside. Perhaps he, and they, and we, just need to let go.”

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David Jaffe Says Iwata Should Be Allowed To Fail

David Jaffe, the game director behind God of War and Twisted Metal, has said on Twitter that Nintendo president Satoru Iwata should be allowed to fail given his past success with the Wii and the Nintendo DS. You can read exactly what Jaffe had to say, below.

“Calling for Iwata to step down [misses] sight of what makes Nintendo great. You’d never get the Wii-type successes if you don’t allow a guy like Iwata to fail hard as well.”

“…that failure can be a sign that a person has lost ‘it’ and needs to go OR a sign that a person is still very much relevant and has tons of great work left in them but is taking the same sorts of chances that — in the past — have lead to great successes but are now — temporarily — leading to some failures. You MUST fail if you want to grow and have new successes.”

“My point is, you WANT a person who fails for these latter reasons and you want to lose one who fails for the initial reasons. I feel Iwata is the [latter] and he’s certainly earned the right to fail more than he has to this point. And that’s from a gamer AND stockholder perspective. If you [want] make money, back the folks who fail properly. Failure isn’t just an option, it’s desired if the goal is big success. And investors who don’t value failure are idiots.”

“Many thought Wii 1 was a bad move at first as well. Point is, so what it’s a bad move? Investors need to be thinking BIG PICTURE and LONG GAME with a company like Nintendo…companies that I admire are the ones that don’t only play for the short term win. you can look at the up and down history of the company and see that if you want to invest in a company like Nintendo, those ups and downs are part of what makes them great.”

“Imagine throwing out ALL of that wonderful knowledge and understanding and HARD lessons learned by cleaning house at Sony [because] the PS3 did not perform as well as investors would have liked. Yes, sometimes the [solution] is to clean house, sometimes it’s to clean a bit of the house, but damn, I think people are losing sight of the value of failure.”

Thanks, Portaldark

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Pachter Believes Nintendo Should Temporarily Release Games On Xbox One And PlayStation 4

Famed Wedbush Morgan analyst Michael Pachter believes one of the solutions to Nintendo’s dilemma would be to temporarily release their games on competing consoles such as the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4. Pachter thinks that by doing this in the short term – while they’re getting ready to bring a more competitive console to the market – they can then withdraw support and once again focus on their own platform.

So what’s the solution for Nintendo? In Pachter’s opinion, the company must swallow its pride and start publishing its first-rate software on competing platforms. Then, once Nintendo is ready to bring a more competitive console to the market, it can withdraw its support from the other systems and focus on its own platform again.

“We believe that it should reconsider its ‘all proprietary, all the time’ model, and should consider making its proprietary console software available on other platforms until it is able to release a new console. Once Nintendo has a new console on the market, we think it would make sense for the company to pull all of its software from the PS4 and Xbox One, and go back to being a proprietary software maker. In the meantime, we believe that the company has a problem that it is not acknowledging or addressing,”

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Enterbrain President Hamamura Says Wii U Needs Killer Games To Be Ressurected

Hirokazu Hamamura, who is prolific within the Japanese video game industry, has told the Mainichi Shinbun that he personally believes that Wii U could bounce back provided Nintendo continue to release killer games for the system. However, he is of the opinion that Nintendo are finding it too difficult to juggle the Nintendo 3DS and the Wii U at the moment. At the end of the interview Hamamura wondered if the Wii U can be “resurrected.”

“Associating the growth of smartphones and the slump of the Wii U is difficult. Two years ago the handheld 3DS was called a failure, and then it bounced back. Of course they are in competition to keep a hold on the users’ time. It can be boosted if killer content is released. However developing a lot of games for both the Wii U and the 3DS is difficult… That’s a fact.”