Tag Archives: paper mario

Super Smash Bros 3DS Will Be Getting A Paper Mario Stage

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Super Smash Bros producer Masahiro Sakurai has revealed via Miiverse that Super Smash Bros for the Nintendo 3DS will feature a gorgeous Paper Mario Sticker Star themed stage. The newly announced stage is fragile so Sakurai hinted that strong winds will blow the stage away. He also revealed a second screenshot this time of a stage based on the S.S. Flavion from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. Here’s what Sakurai had to say.

Pic of the day. For the first time ever in the Super Smash Bros. series, here’s a Paper Mario stage! It’s made of paper, so strong winds will blow it away.

Since the stage is paper, it transforms when it folds over and opens up again. This ship is the S.S. Flavion from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door.

Thanks to those who sent this in

Paper Mario And More In US Club Nintendo Rewards

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Nintendo of America’s Rewards Catalog has been updated and there’s a few things you may want to spend your hard-earned coins on. You can pick up Paper Mario and Kirby Super Star for Wii and Bird & Beans and Metal Torrent for Nintendo 3DS. These games are all available to purchase with your Club Nintendo coins until March 10th.

Thanks to everyone that sent this in.

Gamer Taking Nintendo 3DS With Him As He Walks 3,000 Miles Across US For Charity

nintendo_3ds_sideTo help raise money for Child’s Play, Cody Thomson, 36, is planning to walk across several states in the U.S., including N.C., Tenn., Miss., Ark., Okla., Texas, N.M., Ariz. and Calif. Thomson, a self-proclaimed avid gamer, said to IGN that he is packing his Nintendo 3DS and plans to play Paper Mario, Professor Layton and Fire Emblem at the end of each day. It’s going to take roughly eight months for Thomson to traverse the country, and he will have walked about 3,000 miles once he’s done. Thomson’s lengthy journey begins on March 10th.

“I’ve spent months on the planning. Now I’m a few weeks out from setting off, so it’s a good time to start talking about this and raising some funds for Child’s Play. I’m seeking about $8,000 to fund the costs of the journey and everything else is for the kids. The sky’s the limit. But however much I get, I’m doing this.”

“When I was a kid I had an eye disease and the doctor actually advised that I get a games machine to strengthen my eye muscles. My parents bought me an Atari 2600. I wasn’t hospitalized, but games helped me. They had a beneficial impact. They helped me to see and I think that Child’s Play is wonderful, what they do. Kids in hospital need escapism as much as anybody.”

“I’ve been saving up games. I have Paper Mario, Professor Layton and Fire Emblem planned, so that’s something to look forward to at the end of every day.”

-Cody Thomson

Paper Mario: Sticker Star Review

Deep stories aren’t necessarily needed to make video games enjoyable, but engaging stories are one of the areas in which titles in the Paper Mario series excel. That is… until Paper Mario: Sticker Star.

Paper Mario: Sticker Star has an overtly simple story. In the game, Bowser scatters the six Royal Stickers across the very paper-y Mushroom Kingdom. The main protagonist, Mario, of course, has to retrieve all six stickers and is accompanied by the short-tempered sticker fairy Kersti.

Super Paper Mario, for example, isn’t the best title in the series, but at least it had an entertaining story, unlike Paper Mario: Sticker Star.

Paper Mario: Sticker Star’s visuals are fantastic. Mushroom Kingdom looks very much like a huge arts and crafts project. The game boasts the best visual style in the series to date. Almost everything in the game looks and sounds like paper. In-game characters know they are made up of paper, which is adorable.

For example, toward the beginning of the game, you need to rescue a bunch of Toads – some of which who’ve been stacked away, bent, crumpled and hidden under doormats by Bowser and his minions. Hence the title “Paper Mario: Sticker Star,” designs of the characters, worlds and levels feel appropriate.

The use of stereoscopic 3D in the game is one of the best on the Nintendo 3DS. It easily compares to Super Mario 3D Land’s 3D effects and adds a significant amount of depth to environments.

From the beginning to end, the game’s music is catchy albeit a bit repetitive; separate levels within a world have the same background music. Unfortunately, characters in the game don’t have voices. For example, Mario doesn’t say ‘Oh, no!,’ and Toads don’t make their annoying grumble sounds. The entire narrative is based on text, which, expectedly, is well-written and humorous.

The game revolves around stickers, which are scattered throughout the Mushroom Kingdom. Want to stomp an enemy? Select a Jump sticker. Want to strike a foe with a hammer? Select a Hammer sticker. Want to recover your health? Select a Mushroom sticker. Without stickers, Mario is defenseless. Players must make sure they are stocked with stickers. Stickers may be purchased from Toads and peeled directly from surrounding objects.

There are numerous frustrating levels within the game. Many times, you’ll return to a level – you thought you’ve completed – to look for crucial items in order to progress on your journey. For example, in one level, I searched for a vital item in every visible area; I eventually (and accidentally) found it by slipping off a cliff.

Paper Mario: Sticker Star doesn’t exactly feel like a role-playing game, compared to other titles in the series, which is a bummer. To expand your health meter, you must search for HP-Up Hearts, some of which are hidden extremely well. There are tons of enemies in each world, but players don’t level up after defeating them. This is unfortunate, because you aren’t getting much incentive for battling all the enemies in your way. This also urges you to attempt to runaway during battles. But you can’t, however, runaway each time – your attempt to do so will inevitably fail multiple times.

It’s very different from its predecessors, and although it strips away several fundamental RPG elements, Paper Mario: Sticker Star is one of the best Nintendo 3DS titles of the year and a perfect fit for a handheld game.

7/10

Miyamoto Didn’t Want Story Elements In Paper Mario Sticker Star

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Kensuke Tanabe, software planning and development department for Paper Mario: Sticker Star on the Nintendo 3DS has revealed that Shigeru Miyamoto requested that story elements be removed from the game. Miyamoto believed that the gameplay elements in Paper Mario: Sticker Star were what players really wanted.

“With regard to the story, we did a survey over the Super Paper Mario game in Club Nintendo, and not even 1 percent said the story was interesting. A lot of people said that the ‘Flip’ move for switching between the 3D and 2D dimensions was fun.”

“I originally saw it in a way that’s similar to Miyamoto-san. Personally I think all we need is to have an objective to win the boss battle at the end of the game.”

“I didn’t think we necessarily needed a lengthy story like in an RPG. Instead, we looked at the characteristics of a portable game that can be played little by little in small pieces and packed in lots of little episodes and ideas. I always did like putting in little ideas, so I actually enjoyed it.”