Nintendo

Nintendo lawyers have filed copyright complaints against Super Mario 64 PC port

Torrent Freak is reporting today that Nintendo has used US-based law firm Wildwood Law Group LLC, who works alongside the company, to take down links to Super Mario 64 PC‘s executable from file hosting sites. Nintendo has also started targeted YouTube videos which feature the title running on PC with copyright claims.

“The copyrighted work is Nintendo’s Super Mario 64 video game, including the audio-visual work, software, and fictional character depictions covered by U.S. Copyright Reg. No. PA[REDACTED],” the notice reads.

“The reported file contains an unauthorized derivative work based on Nintendo’s copyrighted work.”

Source

36 comments

      1. 𝑵𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒐 𝑭𝒊𝒓𝒔𝒕 𝑶𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒆𝒓 says:

        It’s him anyway. But I understand your comments. In the past I was subscribed to his channel. But then his videos were not funny anymore imo.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. @Nintendo First Order Reaver
        I used to stay just bc it made me laugh; (comedy gold of 2016-2017 era SMG4)
        But I hav enjoyed his new content as well. Its still the same comedy vids he has always done. But I like tht the characters hav a more fleshed out development; some decent stories and his “Arcs” are pretty decent to good.
        The channel has become more like a Saturday morning cartoon, than a simple yt vid for comedy.
        His quality in story telling has jumped a lil ever since he helped work on, Meta Runner’s 1st season.

        Like

    1. No, don’t worry.
      The PC port doesn’t include the N64 emulator and the rom, because it’s legal (in some circumstances… You have to own the original copy first)

      Like

  1. Dang Nintendo really do be quick on things, I mean I already knew this would happen I don’t get why people release content like this and just expect themselves to not get into any type of trouble, considering the fact that it’s Nintendo either keep it to yourself or keep it on the down low so that it doesn’t get Nintendo attention

    Like

    1. Yah, whenever I brought this up people where like “good luck locating the creators to actually start any legal action” as if it’s easy for someone to hide from existence. Even if they used a VPN to upload a creation, do they really expect that VPN companies want their product advertised as “Good for covering up illegal activity”.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 𝑵𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒐 𝑭𝒊𝒓𝒔𝒕 𝑶𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒆𝒓 says:

        In fact VPN can’t help them for this. The police can always ask to the VPN provider what IP has the router of the person who is using it for hosting this port.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. 𝑵𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒐 𝑭𝒊𝒓𝒔𝒕 𝑶𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒆𝒓 says:

        No I didn’t. But if you remember why that game got removed it wasn’t for a simple demo of the first stage but it was for the models used. In that case the author specifically said that he used the models from Super Mario Galaxy. That’s why the game got removed.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. If the guy used a proper VPN that doesn’t log IP addresses then there’s no info for them to obtain. You don’t think Hollywood studios haven’t tried this before when their movie (that’s still in theaters) leaked online?

        Like

      4. “do they really expect that VPN companies want their product advertised as “Good for covering up illegal activity”.”

        Civil liability, not criminal activity. 100% chance the VPN would rather defend the identities of people performing minor acts of copyright abuse than be known as the VPN who easily hands out the identity of its customers.

        “In fact VPN can’t help them for this. The police can always ask to the VPN provider what IP has the router of the person who is using it for hosting this port.”

        It isn’t a criminal charge. The police won’t be involved. Nintendo can, and probably will, ask for a court order to provide the IP address. IF the VPN stores that information, which they shouldn’t, then Nintendo can serve papers but the IP address isn’t evidence of who specifically committed the act. It will be hard for Nintendo to serve papers, but Nintendo has shown they’re willing to spend the dollars to defend the pennies so there’s a good shot they’ll get there in the end.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. They can’t. Even if nothing can really be done to reverse the distribution, Nintendo is still legally obligated to take action because it’s all or nothing when it comes to IP protection

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Honestly I don’t really buy the whole IP “protection” argument on these situations. Sonic fans make their own fan games all of the time and SEGA lets it fly, yet SEGA still retains the copyright for the Sonic games. What it really boils down to is money, and how is Nintendo profiting from Mario 64 nowadays when they only way to get it officially from them is through the Wii U eshop?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Look into copyright laws and they kind of have to. Admittedly, they could take a slightly more lax approach to these fan projects but… well.. idk. It seems to be working for them as company. They got more longevity so maybe being more aggressive with copyright violations has worked in their favor.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. At least in Norwegian law, you have to protect your IP to claim it as yours. Some companies here have acted too late against others using their IP, and now lost their right to claim it as their own. Which mean other can like use their slogans, images etc etc without any need for asking permission. But if you have a record of winning court cases and have documentation that you have taken legal actions against copyright infringement, you will have the rights to claim said IP as your own. In other words: companies themselves have to protect their IP, because it’s not the laws job. (I’m not defending anyone here btw).

        Liked by 1 person

      4. “Nintendo is still legally obligated to take action because it’s all or nothing when it comes to IP protection” You know, people like to say this a lot to act like Nintendo has no choice but…it’s really not true, like by far Nintendo is the most trigger happy when it comes to taking down fanworks, emulations, heck even lets players and the definition on emulations and fair use on their own site is blatantly untrue.

        Sega has’nt lost the I.P to Sonic and they literally went out of their way to get together fan-gamers to make a sonic thing and have shown nothing but support for fan projects of all kinds, they didn’t take down the Sonic X reanimated, they publicized it and more.
        I don’t believe any other company has made a big stint out of chasing down pirates either, barring some companies such as Capcom using anti measures like Denuvo which…just don’t work and only serve to screw over paying customers(but that’s a different discussion).

        The truth is, no other company feels the need to do this as much as Nintendo does and they themselves vastly, vastly overestimate the “harm” that this stuff does(when studies have shown piracy, emulation etc to have a negligible effect on the industry, especially for games this old, not to mention the age old false idea that piracy=lost sale, I could also go into how piracy is in some ways necessary for games preservation because companies have shown a complete lack of responsibility on this themselves).

        The irony is that Sega should have far more reason to be scared of fan-games and the like because their own work keeps getting one upped by it in the public mind, but they don’t. Nintendo on the other hand gets scared shit-less that Pokemon Uranium will eat into S/S sales, like there even exists a reality out there where a Pokemon fan is gonna turn down S/S for Uranium.

        Liked by 3 people

  2. 𝑵𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒐 𝑭𝒊𝒓𝒔𝒕 𝑶𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒆𝒓 says:

    See alipheesia? I told you Nintendo is gonna remove this illegal port.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. 𝑵𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒐 𝑭𝒊𝒓𝒔𝒕 𝑶𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒆𝒓 says:

        But I told you that Nintendo is gonna take action on it. Also the link I found was on a Google drive, which is the common app that people used for put stuff. It’s an easy target for Nintendo. The port can’t be removed indeed but the links yes.

        Like

  3. People misunderstood the word “natively” because it implies that Nintendo themselves ported the game to PC otherwise they wouldn’t have taken it down.

    Like

  4. My response to Nintendo in these cases is always the same; “Then do it yourselves!”

    Though in the case of the Metroid 2 remake, they actually did, so we shall see…

    Liked by 1 person

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