Nintendo Switch

The RyujiNX Switch Emulator Is Now Booting Up Some Commercial Games

Nintendo Switch emulation is still in its very early stages, for obvious reasons, but one of the two emulators that are currently out there has managed to hit a milestone. RyujiNX is a Switch emulator from gdkchan that is programmed in C#. The emulator can now boot up some commercial games “up to the menus”. However, the games are not playable yet. Two examples are Cave Story+ and Puyo Puyo Tetris. Both games can be booted up, but attempting to play them results in significant lag.

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55 comments

      1. That’s no excuse to turn a blind eye to it it’s entitled people who feel like they deserve any video game they want and don’t give a damn about the developer’s time and effort

        Liked by 4 people

      2. How wrong you are. Sega had lost millions of dollars due to the failures of the Sega cd and 32x along side the Saturn failing as a system. The piracy issues of the dream cast were not the main factor in their decision to end hardware production because any smart and informed person would also know that the dream cast just couldn’t compete sales wise against the PS2.

        As for the emulator,they’re entirely legal and by the time the emulator is 100% efficient,the lifespan of the console will be up and a new system will be the focus. So I wouldn’t worry in any shape or form about the switch being crippled by this.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Wrong. The Dreamcast first year was meet with incredible support from many third parties around the world, and while they did not report positive numbers, it was a massive increase in revenue thanks to the amount of software the Dreamcast was selling, mass piracy started on the Dreamcast 8 months after its release, and guess which department dropped in profits by a whopping 64% the following year? software, this killed off support for the console midway through its second year, no one wanted to develop for it because developers were disgusted by how easy it was to pirate on it.

        You excuse was created by gamers that pirate hardcore and contribute to Sega downfall back them, just so you can feel better about yourself and take the guilt away.

        You guys are the worse.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I’m sorry but that’s the stupidest shit I’ve ever heard. It’s like CNN making up shit to suit their agenda. Sega consoles failed because they were a shitty company that only did good because of the guy in charge of Sega of America. When they ignored his smart thinking, they started sinking faster than the Titanic. Piracy didn’t screw Sega; Sega screwed Sega.

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    1. An emulator for a new system will never progress fast enough to threaten the console’s sales. The GC/Wii emulator was one of the most impressive emulators to come out and it’s still just now getting over major technical issues with shaders and such. Rom carts have been a much bigger threat for Nintendo, because they can use the actual console to run free games perfectly. If they manage to get something like that out, then you can worry.

      Honestly, used game sales have always caused more damage to the industry than people building emulators. If you’re THAT worried about taking money from developers, only buy new.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Let’s yet again point out that the free sharing of previously published information which has not been held in private keeping by its originator is a legitimate practice regardless of those who spuriously title it “piracy” and claim it as some kind of violation. (Despite it having roughly nothing to do with robbery on the high seas, causing no harm, and producing no victims…)

        Ownership is conferred by possession, good-faith utilization, and unharmful acquisition. Someone duplicating by their own labor and resources (including that of collaboration) an idea or even physical possession of yours which is visible to them in the natural course of their life is no slight against you at all. It is an activity that has nothing to do with you, as you are the sole possessor of the original, and they, the duplicate. If you have striven to keep these ideas (or objects which express ideas) private, and this actor has trespassed on your privacy in order to duplicate these ideas, then you have been slighted, or even violated. But to have an object which you openly display duplicated is the business of the duplicator and not your business at all.

        Nintendo produces their products as commodities for exchange in a capital-based market system. This means producing millions of “duplicates” as closely to one another as possible and distributing them at mass scale to whoever can/will pay enough. This act in and of itself surrenders all claim to private possession of a particular idea; the most that can be leveraged is material possession of a particular object. To willfully place these systems in the hands and games in front of the eyes of millions is to surrender exclusive possession of the right to express the ideas contained within them.

        This is because human labor – all human labor – is based on the act of observing and reassembling concepts. This starts in infancy when we learn to walk and navigate in part by observing our parents, but it extends well into complex adult behaviors like advanced physics or high literature. Even an individual alone in a room writing a book is in some sense at collaboration – with the memories and lasting impact of all of those direct collaborators they have encountered before, with the residual impressions of a thousand tangentially related past experiences, with their own shifting conceptualizations of self and world…

        It is necessary to protect the right of a given human to engage in the labor of duplicating those ideas which they encounter naturally in the course of their life because all innovation begins in duplication, and “new” ideas only emerge gradually, by way of demarcation. Context ensures that some ideas strike without warning and to great impact, while others fizzle quickly after great build up, but the extent to which something is “revolutionary” or “unprecedented” is entirely relative.

        Nintendo chose to expose millions to the observation, possession, and use of these objects and their encoded ideas. To then demand total control over the behavior these millions undertake relative to these concepts is unjust and borderline tyrannical. What’s been published is published; what’s not is not. You are not entitled to retroactively dictate the behavior of all those who encountered ideas you “originally” produced and disseminated, even if that behavior is their reproduction and continued dissemination. If you want total control over your ideas, do not publish them. If you want to publish them, accept that these ideas will be duplicated and reimplemented and modified.

        There is a “right to copy,” but it is the universal right of all humans to copy those ideas, forms, and objects which they encounter naturally, absent the willful violation of protective privacy measures, to whatever degree they are able, so that they may build upon this act of duplication towards improvisation and eventually innovation.

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    2. Or, You know. It could be the paid online. Or the Lootcrates. Or the companies. Or the fanboys threatening people. Or the inability to adapt to the current age.

      Like

  1. }{ While I admire the technical prowess required to get to this stage of emulation, I also despise piracy, and think that it would be beneficial to all if they ceased work on the emulator until such a time as when the switch is considered an ancient console… }{

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    1. To be fair, it will probably take the Switch’s lifespan just to get the emulator running enough games well enough to be a financial threat. Of course, Nintendo systems do seem easier and easier to emulate each generation. Nintendo has always had more issues with things like rom carts on their handhelds. Those are what really cut into sales.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The Switch shares similarities with the 3DS in hardware and software so the other emulator actually uses a lot of the same code as the Citra, the 3DS emulator.

        Like

      2. Well the GC-Wii similarities are the reason Dolphin was able to emulate Wii games so early on for sure.

        I didn’t think this was the Switch emulator they forked off of Citra. At any rate, I’d still be surprised if this could play more than a few titles decently by Switch’s third or fourth year. Citra is 4 years out and my understanding is there’s still plenty of work to do (I haven’t messed with it).

        Liked by 1 person

      3. My computer isn’t even that bad and it can’t emulate 3Ds games, you need to have a ridiculously high end pc in order to emulate new hardware. The average consumer’s pc can’t handle emulation on this level, it’s only people who have very powerful gaming pcs who can run this stuff.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. My computer isn’t all that great and it can run 3DS games pretty decently at above HD resolutions. Sure, I’m using a 5820K which is a 6 core processor but emulators generally tend to favor single-threaded performance and won’t use all those cores so a cheaper processor should do just fine.

        Really, the reason that some computers can’t run some games at full frame-rate has more to do with the emulator not be as mature as something like Dolphin for example.

        Newer systems also don’t have to be necessarily be harder to emulate. Take Cemu for example, the Wii U emulator, since Wii U games are abstracted from the hardware by an operating system, Cemu doesn’t always have to emulate the instruction hardware and can instead emulate the API which far less intensive of a process. It also helps that the GPUs are modern console are identical to current desktop GPUs. As a result, I’ve seen people with modern Core i3s emulating Breath of the Wild at full frame rate.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Got more important things to worry about in the world right now than some emulator in it’s early, early, early stages that won’t threaten the Switch as the system will be replaced by a new Nintendo system by the time this emulator is fully functional. But Nintendo is a religion to some poor saps so this is the worst thing that could happen in their little worlds. *shrug* To each their own.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pretty much. On some articles I do read the comments just to get a chuckle out of the console war kids who talk like Nintendo is a beloved family member, and not a company who happens to put out some good games.
      Feelsgood to own at least 2 consoles from each of Nintendo, Sega, Microsoft and Sony.
      And a capable PC.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I find that weird as well. C# actually isn’t all that slow, but the garbage collector can be a problem for games, and in turn for a game system emulator. Working around the GC is difficult.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Read it again. It never says the emulators are illegal; it’s talking about ROMs. There is a big difference. There is NOTHING Nintendo can do about emulators or downloading them or even downloading emulated games.

      Besides, I don’t know if you’re aware but Nintendo of America is ran by morons. Tyrannical, kid friendly obsessed morons. I’d honestly put them a 4 or 5 rungs away from EA of how bad the place is.

      Like

    2. You do not understand U.S. law. Nintendo has no authority to declare a particular action illegal, that is the sole purview of the legislative and judicial branches of government. The process of developing emulators for existing computer systems has been tried in court before and is very specifically protected as a legal practice as long as one does not violate independent laws against corporate espionage/reverse engineering or the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials. (Such as cracking and reimplementing an official Nintendo emulator rather than building your own, or redistributing game images you ripped/dumped yourself from legally obtained media.) The process of emulation itself is in no way suspect.

      What you are linking to on Nintendo’s site is an attempt to strong arm those citizens who are unaware that emulation is a perfectly legal, legitimate practice into thinking that because Nintendo declares it illegal, it is so.

      It isn’t.

      Like

  3. You’re wrong again, it clearly states in the corporate information section that making emulators is illegal. Read the questions about ROMs and emulation.

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    1. Whatever. I don’t make emulators, anyway, so no skin off my back one way or the other. I’d rather enjoy emulations others have made of older games turned into original stories by fusing two different games together. Speaking of, I should really go play that emulated game I got using Ocarina of Time’s world but with the gameplay of Super Mario 64. The story for that seemed very interesting enough.

      Like

      1. Yeah well, I prefer that Nintendo takes off this switch emulator and do something about it. I know it might take a long time before it’s ready to play commercial games for the Nintendo switch but I don’t think it’s alright that they’re making it. Let’s see what happens.

        Like

  4. Prefer whatever you want, developing emulators is as legitimate a practice as developing brand new systems. This whole attempt to distinguish between the two on a moral plane is absurd and nonsensical.

    Like

    1. wrong again, fucking read the section on the nintendo site. I’m not as stubborn as you to realize emulators are illegal to make and even now that the nintendo switch hasn’t been out for long, if you think they’re not, fine but I’m not going to sit and do nothing about it besides I have already reported this to nintendo.

      andrew

      Like

      1. Did you even read my comment? I’ll repost the one I left above here, because you keep posting that tiresome link to Nintendo’s website as if it was authoritative:

        You do not understand U.S. law. Nintendo has no authority to declare a particular action illegal, that is the sole purview of the legislative and judicial branches of government. The process of developing emulators for existing computer systems has been tried in court before and is very specifically protected as a legal practice as long as one does not violate independent laws against corporate espionage/reverse engineering or the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials. (Such as cracking and reimplementing an official Nintendo emulator rather than building your own, or redistributing game images you ripped/dumped yourself from legally obtained media.) The process of emulation itself is in no way suspect.

        What you are linking to on Nintendo’s site is an attempt to strong arm those citizens who are unaware that emulation is a perfectly legal, legitimate practice into thinking that because Nintendo declares it illegal, it is so.

        It isn’t.

        Like

      2. I read your comment and I DON’T CARE, you’re just being a smart ass and a moron. you don’t even care if a company makes an emulator. making an emulator of a console that is still in the market should be illegal. I don’t mind the emulators that are still available for download but because the switch is still selling I don’t think that it’s good that they’re making one from a console that’s been out for one year.

        Like

    1. Why are you so invested in the switch retaining the exclusive ability to play Switch games? How are you hurt if other machines are made capable of doing this? Why do you even care?

      Like

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