Hajime Tabata, who is the director behind the well-received Final Fantasy XV, has called the Nintendo Switch a “dream machine” because of the console’s ability to change from a handheld to a home console. However, he also said that he would like to take the concept that bit further and allow it to run various applications like a tablet.

“Given my track record… I’ve worked on handheld titles, but I’ve also worked on console games. So the fact that Switch is both at the same time is really fascinating to me. I’m really interested in coming up with ideas and how to capitalize on that technology and how to create the best experience possible on the technology. But I’m not quite sure that I have it yet.

“You have your Switch sitting in front of the television and you’re playing on the big screen and then you take it out, put it down on the table. It becomes a monitor. You take out the two Joy-Cons, and you play with a friend … it doesn’t stop there, because in my mind, it would be really perfect if you could then take this new monitor and use it like a tablet, for example, and play different apps on it like you would on your iPhone or your Android. So basically, it’s accomplishing three tasks in one machine. It’s kind of like the dream machine.”

“While I may not be working on anything for it at this point in time, a lot of people on the staff are really interested in the Switch. Myself included! Many of the people on the dev team are older; they’re married; they have kids. One of the things they’d like to do is create something they could also play with their children, or that their children could play on their own, for example.”

“You have the Switch, and you have smartphones. I’m not really sure if handheld gaming will still run on dedicated systems, or whether they’ll be on machines or devices that will allow you to game and also do other things. It’s hard to say.

“It could be like cloud gaming. Something that, for a long time, people have said, ‘Oh, this is the future.’ Maybe the future is cloud gaming, but it hasn’t taken off as much as people had anticipated. Maybe once it becomes a little bit more mainstream, when things are a little bit more clear on what happens on the client side and what happens on the server side … then things will really start to take off.

“If cloud gaming then becomes mainstream, I don’t think it’s outside the realm of possibility for you to be able to pick up a game on your phone, start playing for a little bit, and say, ‘Oh, you know what? I want to play on the big screen,’ and put it down and play the exact same thing — pick up where you left off — on the television.”

Source / Via

 

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12 Comments »

    • Might be tough to do.
      —————————
      Switch = 512 Gflops
      —————————
      Xbox One = 1.31 Tflops
      Ps4 = 1.84 Tflops
      Ps4 pro = 4.12 Tflops
      Xbox Scorpio = 6.0 Tflops

      Not good.

      Like

      • You underestimate the power of the Switch side.
        Teraflops and Gigaflops are just numbers created to make nerd’s knobs stiff. Numbers from completely different CPU architectures mind you. Don’t base everything on them.

        Like

        • Gigaflops = billions.
          Teraflops = trillions.
          Floating Ops are not just numbers son. . Sure, more flops does not necessarily mean better but when the numbers are this low, and the gap is this huge there is little hope that the Switch will be able to keep up…Not a bleeding chickens chance in Thailand.

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          • It won’t be able to keep up on a technical level, but does that even matter? To some, I suppose it does.
            Do we even know how many GFLOPS/TFLOPS the Switch can do yet, or is that 512 GFLOPS made up. I just need a source.

            Like

  1. Tabata: “The Switch is amazing! It’s a dream machine, the most amazing gaming console to ever exist! OMG!”

    Media: “So are you going to put FF15 on the Switch?”

    Tabata: “nahh I don’t think so”

    Like

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