Nintendo

Davide Soliani Behind Mario + Rabbids Pitched Demo Of Wind Waker On GBA

Davide Soliani who is behind the creative mind behind Mario + Rabbids: Kingdom Battle on the Nintendo Switch has tweeted a surprise to fans. Soliani originally pitched a demo internally of The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker for the Game Boy Advance. He’s shared an image of what the game would look like below. It didn’t get very far internally over at Ubisoft and obviously never made its way to Nintendo, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

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21 comments

    1. Agreed. If they want to continue the BotW formula, fine, but I’d like at least a little something for fans of the classic formula.

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      1. Yeah, the thing I miss the most are the dungeons, I wasn’t really a big fan of the complete a puzzle and collect your reward the shrines did, even the Divine Beasts aren’t quite up to par. If they do something like Majora’s Mask where they use the same engine it could save them more time to add more proper dungeons. Idk if the novelty of exploring a large overworld will save the next game.

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      2. Yeah, definitely agree. Dungeons are the No.1 thing I look forward to in Zelda, and the Shrines and Divine Beasts really didn’t come close to matching that.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. What exactly do you mean by “traditional”? Personally I think most of the features/mechanics from past 3D Zeldas (i.e. unique dungeons, special items, etc.) could be introduced into the BotW formula with relative ease.

      On a side note, they need a team to cover 2D Zelda. A lot of people still want to see those.

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      1. Traditional as in the style we had between OoT and Skyward Sword. I’m not really sure what to call it to differentiate from the modern open world Zelda the series is falling towards.

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      2. Like linear gameplay and story, rather than the “play and win however you want” style that BotW employs? I’m not sure I want to see a return to that kind of Zelda. I think Nintendo just needs to find a perfect balance of the 2 styles. I liked the more focused gameplay of previous games. They made for a much stronger story than BotW could, but looking back, I didn’t like coming up on an area I couldn’t access because there was a 10 foot, scalable-looking, locked gate blocking the path.

        The next game should have an open world style more similar to the first LoZ. In that game, you could go anywhere you wanted right from the start, but there were still some areas you couldn’t access outright. One of the dungeons (4 I think) required the raft to access. Other areas required the bridge, recorder, etc. So BotW for instance could’ve had a structure that was too tall to climb without the hookshot or something. The next game also needs clear cut, story-driven missions and more cutscenes.

        The BotW formula can be refined imo to include the best of both worlds. Just beeds some solid thought put into it.

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    1. This information is wrong and you should feel ashamed for spreading it. They didn’t really rip it off. Minish Cap came out (in Japan) in 2004, and started development well before February of 2003 (as stated in an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma). It was built in the engine of the already released Four Swords (released in December, 2002).

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    1. This information is wrong and you should feel ashamed for spreading it. They didn’t really rip it off. Minish Cap came out (in Japan) in 2004, and started development well before February of 2003 (as stated in an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma). It was built in the engine of the already released Four Swords (released in December, 2002).

      Liked by 1 person

    1. This information is wrong and you should feel ashamed for spreading it. They didn’t really rip it off. Minish Cap came out (in Japan) in 2004, and started development well before February of 2003 (as stated in an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma). It was built in the engine of the already released Four Swords (released in December 2002).

      Liked by 2 people

    1. This information is wrong and you should feel ashamed for spreading it. They didn’t really rip it off. Minish Cap came out (in Japan) in 2004, and started development well before February of 2003 (as stated in an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma). It was built in the engine of the already released Four Swords (released in December, 2002).

      Like

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