Nintendo Switch

Wolfgang Wozniak, An Indie Dev, Says That Nintendo Has Turned Him Down 5 Times

Wolfgang Wozniak is an indie dev known for making games such as VA-11 HALL-A. Wozniak is very much interested in the Nintendo Switch, and he has been trying to bring games, including VA-11 HALL-A, to the console. However, according to remarks he recently made to Dotesports, he has been turned down 5 times:

“Nintendo of America specifically, has been uncharacteristically ambiguous surrounding what they are looking for in a game. We’ve been turned down by Nintendo of America five times. You will likely notice that most of the indie games on Switch are from one of those regions, have a big publisher behind them, or have experienced great success previously on Steam. If your work does not fall into one of those three categories, then it seems like Nintendo of America is not interested. I’m certain that we’ll be able to bring Switch owners something special in the future, but I am uncertain as to when that future will be.”

Wozniak also revealed that there is a game that got turned down by Nintendo for being too mature:

“It’s a short and sweet game where two people have a conversation. It’s an adult situation, but there is no what you would call ‘adult content’ in it. Specifically, this was mentioned as being exactly what they were looking for, but too mature.”

Source

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22 comments

  1. The first paragraph in that source is somehow suggesting the Wii was a failure, and the second is implying every developer that wants their game on Nintendo’s console should get it. Later in the article it goes over how NOA surprisingly has preferences about types of games they’ll approve, and then actually dare to be more lenient on content if it’s in an already majorly successful title.

    They aren’t being “uncharacteristically ambiguous”, they’re being “characteristically ambiguous” like always. Later in the article he even praises NOA’s documentation and hands-on production approach as being “second to none.” Maybe they’re just trying to keep a similar high benchmark for their approval process? It’s just too easy now to raise an issue about all their “old habits” with articles like this when the Switch is becoming so successful.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. “known for making games such as VA-11 HALL-A”
    He just ported it to the Vita (badly), but keeps saying its “his game”. Check literally anywhere else and you’ll see it’s made by Sukeban Games. Hopefully this hack keeps getting rejected.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Whilst I want to avoid Switch being too exclusive as a place to develop and missing out on great indies (something that it really looks like *isn’t* happening so far), they have to be somewhat choosy about what they’re going to let onto the platform. Storefronts that don’t do this such as the App Store and Steam have serious discovery issues i.e. great games are being buried away under reams of horrendous and mediocre ones. This is particularly relevant for Switch right now because the eShop is really bare-bones and hard to navigate effectively and this would accentuate the discovery issue. It’s a tough tightrope for Nintendo to walk, and it may mean that a few deserving games miss out on a chance to be on the platform.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’d be less funny if the developer was a passionate fan of Nintendo’s IPs, and want to bring back an old IP, or save a failing one.

      Nintendo has always been go at ignoring people and doing whatever they feel like.

      Everyone else’s options are to either throw out all wishes and pretend to be happy, or just quit Nintendo, and video games (if you don’t have preference for Sony and Microsoft’s libraries).

      Like

  4. Unfortunately we do don’t have enough information to make a rational decision on this as we don’t know the exact reason it was rejected. (It could have said death to all jews in that unnamed and unreleased conversation game for all we know) All we know is based on what he claims.

    Like

  5. Nintendo is clearly a corrupted environment, but which isn’t?
    Try with bribery or just wait for incidental luck, the world work all the same where there is money.
    I voluntarily rejected it (but didn’t end with luck). Money is dirty stuff, and people do other dirty stuff to reach it.

    Like

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