Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Doug Bowser on Joy-Con drift repairs “We’re always looking at what is being sent in, and understanding that better”

Doug Bowser at Nintendo has responded to questions about the infamous Joy-Con drift, or rather explained more about the company’s stance around repairs, when asked about the issues surrounding the problem during an interview with Polygon. “First and foremost, we want every consumer to have a great experience with their Nintendo Switch and with the games they play on Nintendo Switch,” he mentioned. “That’s of utmost importance to us.”

Harking back to the Reggie Fils-Aime days, he echoes the former president by saying: “Our mission is to put smiles on faces. And we want to make sure that happens. If consumers have any issue with our hardware and/or software, we want them to contact us, when we will work through the proper solution to get them up and running as fast as possible.

Doug Bowser continued with “Specific to the Joy-Cons themselves, we’ve been working very closely with consumers if and when they might have issues, whether it’s a replacement or repair.”

He then goes on to advise readers that Nintendo is wanting to better understand issues surrounding the controllers: “And then, what I will say, as we look at our repair cycles, we’re always looking at what is being sent in and for what reasons, and understanding that better. And without going into any details, it always gives us an opportunity to make improvements as we go forward.”

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8 comments

  1. It’s not a matter of if, but when. Joy-con, if used properly and cautiously, will have drift appear in about a year. You can’t avoid drift, it will come to you eventually. Using thumb caps on the control stick allows less space for dust to get in, thus reducing your chance of getting drift in the near future. But realize that the Wii U and all the other consoles and handhelds Nintendo released didn’t have drift because they are big enough to fit in a proper semi-sphere, a more effective, but bigger way to do analog sticks. You have to understand how a control stick to know what I’m talking about. Since the Switch is designed to fit any lifestyle and go anywhere with you to support your schedule, it’s made to be small and fit anywhere. (Form follows function) Nintendo can’t fit in a semi-sphere in the tiny joy-cons; there’s simply not enough room. They had to go an alternate route by using rubber flaps to cover a tiny semi ball that guides the stick. It replaces bulk for bust. Still, this is their problem, and repairing joy-cons isn’t effective enough. Nintendo is a family-friendly company, yet how can they follow that when the only option they give to “fix” this is spending $90 on a replacement that WILL get drift eventually, or send them in for repair, which from experience, takes about a month. That’s not friendly at ALL, for families or anyone! Nintendo’s quality is “drifting” and soon they’re gonna have to shape up. They have been continually surprised and disappointing us this year, and in a year like this, none of us needed that. They could at least admit it and say something, but I don’t think they will. If they were going to, they would have already done it because it’s not like a game announcement; it necessary improvements to keep us as their consumers. What the heck Nintendo!

  2. That’s stupid. Why didn’t they correct this in 2017? Just sat there repairing joycons and at the same time continuing making defective controllers not even changing them.
    Just like Hyundai and Kia fires just sit there like dummies in 2017 looking at your vehicles catching fire and not doing nothing

  3. It’s not a matter of if, but when. Joy-con, if used properly and cautiously, will have drift appear in about a year. You can’t avoid drift, it will come to you eventually. Using thumb caps on the control stick allows less space for dust to get in, thus reducing your chance of getting drift in the near future. But realize that the Wii U and all the other consoles and handhelds Nintendo released didn’t have drift because they are big enough to fit in a proper semi-sphere, a more effective, but bigger way to do analog sticks. You have to understand how a control stick to know what I’m talking about. Since the Switch is designed to fit any lifestyle and go anywhere with you to support your schedule, it’s made to be small and fit anywhere. (Form follows function) Nintendo can’t fit in a semi-sphere in the tiny joy-cons; there’s simply not enough room. They had to go an alternate route by using rubber flaps to cover a tiny semi ball that guides the stick. It replaces bulk for bust. Still, this is their problem, and repairing joy-cons isn’t effective enough. Nintendo is a family-friendly company, yet how can they follow that when the only option they give to “fix” this is spending $90 on a replacement that WILL get drift eventually, or send them in for repair, which from experience, takes about a month. That’s not friendly at ALL, for families or anyone! Nintendo’s quality is “drifting” and soon they’re gonna have to shape up. They have been continually surprised and disappointing us this year, and in a year like this, none of us needed that. They could at least admit it and say something, but I don’t think they will. If they were going to, they would have already done it because it’s not like a game announcement; it necessary improvements to keep us as their consumers. What the heck Nintendo!

  4. Hm, maybe, Bowser… I should say “Doug” Bowser really needs to be gentle with those controllers next time, I gotta say, he sure is a big dude with those big sausage fingers, only but to break ’em, bad bowser bad!. (being sarcastically stupid)

  5. “. . .And then, what I will say, as we look at our repair cycles, we’re always looking at what is being sent in and for what reasons, and understanding that better. . .”

    You guys have been sent the same piece of tech, with the same defect, for over 3 years, and you STILL don’t know how to prevent it in new models!?

    1. Probably because they didn’t have the proper tech on how to identify what’s causing the joy-con drift issue and they are trying to stop it from preventing it from happening to others. I’m also a bit concern about the New Nintendo Switch pro and I believe this drift issue is going to happen alongside it and people will soon start to say that Nintendo can’t fix the issue and on the new updated system and soon another lawsuit will be coming on its way.

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